News & Blogs

Can handwriting survive in a digital age?

Posted on 18th August, 2015

Postcard

The answer is an overwhelming yes.  It can and will, and here’s why.

There have been an increasing number of articles in print and online recently on the subject, and why writing matters.
And I’m not taking about writing in capital letters – is that really a serious suggestion?

The folly of giving up on writing by hand has already been recognised by a number of states in the USA who have reversed previous decisions to do so, and I suspect that Finland will follow suit in due course.

It is a myth that we have to choose between the keyboard and pen.  As someone so eloquently put it last week (I think it was in the Independent), it’s a bit like saying you are giving up walking because you have learned to drive a car.  One doesn’t replace the other.

What started out five years ago and is now National Stationery Week’s Writing Matters campaign was the result of a belief that someone needed to speak up for all those who think it is still important to write by hand.  There is so much evidence to support this.

The Prime Minister said in the Daily Telegraph last week that “teachers not bureaucrat should decide how best to educate our children”.School routine

That may be true up to a point but this is too big a decision to leave to local authorities and schools were it ever to come to this.

The Government was right to reintroduce handwriting onto the Secondary School curriculum last year, but children should be encouraged and taught to write even earlier.  I don’t think many people would object, given that YouGov research commissioned earlier this year by National Stationery Week revealed that 97% of adults think it is important that children are taught to write at school.

Let’s make sure it stays that way.

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Official Guinness World Record for Noris coloured pencil

Posted on 6th August, 2015

StaedtlerStaedtler has broken the record for the longest coloured pencil in the world.  The record was made possible through the use of the unique WOPEX material and the innovative manufacturing process.

The new world record holder is 459.97 metres long and orange and black-striped.

Official Guinness World Record

More than 130 employees worked on the creation of the 459.97 metre-long coloured pencil.  The Noris coloured pencil was produced from three different resins of which, among other materials, wood is a substantial part.

The official certificateThe world record was verified, compliant with the rules, by an official employee from the Guinness World Records Company. “We are very pleased that we were able to beat the existing world record and we are very proud of our employees who have made this world record possible,” says Erna Müller, Head of Corporate Communications at STAEDTLER.  After its big day, the longest coloured pencil in the world was handed over to students of art, with the aim of it being used for a work of art for posterity, so preserving the record-breaking pencil for eternity.

Pencils made from WOPEX are not created like the traditional lead and coloured pencils by gluing wooden panels together in several steps. Pencils and coloured pencils made out of WOPEX come about from a single mould.

For more information go to www.staedtler.co.uk

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Euroffice’s Sharpie Shout

Posted on 23rd April, 2015

Euroffice are helping ‘GetBritainWriting’ for National Stationery Week with #SharpieShout

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